THERE has been growing interest in understanding whether perioperative events such as short-term exposure to a general anesthesia could have a deleterious effect on the oncologic outcomes of cancer surgery by promoting growth and progression of the so-called minimally residual disease. Specifically, it has been hypothesized that the use of volatile anesthetics could be associated with minimally residual disease proliferation, whereas propofol could promote apoptosis and have antimetastatic effects. In this issue of Anesthesiology, Makito et al. report the results of a retrospective study evaluating the association between overall or recurrence-free survival after cancer surgery and the use of propofol-based total intravenous anesthesia versus volatile anesthetic-based general anesthesia. This cohort study included cancer patients who underwent esophagectomy, gastrectomy, hepatectomy, cholecystectomy, pancreatectomy, colectomy, and rectal cancer surgery. Makito et al. have to be commended...

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