Ketamine is an “old” drug and has been in use for more than a half-century. It is perhaps older than many of those administering it. It has a wide range of clinical effects and notoriously complex molecular actions, many of which are not fully understood. A first step toward obtaining the greatest benefit from ketamine administration is to understand what the body does to ketamine after dosing. If we can predict the time course of ketamine concentrations in the body after dosing using a robust pharmacokinetic model, then it can play a role toward finding infusion schemes maximizing beneficial effects and minimizing detrimental effects. It is this challenge to develop a pharmacokinetic model for ketamine taken by Kamp et al. with their meta-analysis in this edition of Anesthesiology.

Numerous pharmacokinetic models for ketamine are...

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