Cell salvage is one of the cornerstones of perioperative blood conservation. Its use has been associated with a reduction in allogeneic erythrocyte transfusion in a number of clinical scenarios where excessive bleeding is experienced.2,3  Autologous erythrocyte transfusions may reduce transfusion-associated adverse reactions due to their favorable immunologic profile (patient’s own blood) and possible immunological benefit of fresh blood (immune-suppressive effects of storage). Traditional centrifugation-based devices can only recover erythrocytes while platelets and other coagulation factors are lost in the process. Although there is now an increasing number of alternatives to replace fibrinogen (e.g., fibrinogen concentrate) or specific coagulation factors (e.g., 4-factor prothrombin complex concentrate) in the context of acquired coagulopathy, allogeneic platelet transfusion remains the only option to treat thrombocytopenia and potential platelet dysfunction. Because allogeneic platelets carry the highest risk...

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