John W. Severinghaus, M.D., who invented modern blood-gas analysis by combining electrodes for carbon dioxide, oxygen, and pH into one machine, died June 2 at age 99. He was also the first to measure the uptake of inhaled anesthetics in the lung, developed methods for measuring end-tidal gases in the operating room, and was a major figure in studying the control of breathing and adaptation to high altitude in humans. John truly was among the important thought leaders in anesthesiology in the last century and was honored as the first recipient of the American Society of Anesthesiologists award for research in 1986. Born the same year that J. S. Haldane’s Respiration brought physiology into the modern era, John, more than anyone since, wove the science of respiration together with the art of medicine. That union enabled his...

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