The term “apneic oxygenation” and research on it in humans originated in the 1950s. Interest in the topic likely arose from problems with airway management in the early days of anesthesia practice, the recent introduction of arterial blood gas analysis, and an increasingly academic bent to anesthesiology. From the 1960s to 1980s, researchers studying apneic subjects reported the use of passive insufflation of oxygen to prevent arterial desaturation, as well as reporting that an initial nonlinear rise of arterial carbon dioxide was followed by a linear rise thereafter.2,3  During the last 2 decades, humidified high-flow nasal cannula devices have transitioned from specialized use in neonatal intensive care units to widespread use in critically-ill adults, as the devices provide more effective noninvasive oxygenation and some degree of ventilatory support with less discomfort to the patient than other options.4,5  Transnasal humidified rapid-insufflation ventilatory exchange (THRIVE),...

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