Anesthesiologists routinely assess and provide perioperative care for patients who are older and vulnerable to adverse postoperative outcomes. For many older patients, this vulnerability can be traced back to the presence of frailty, a multidimensional syndrome related to the accumulation of age- and disease-related deficits.2,3  Accordingly, multiple guidelines recommend that frailty be assessed in all older people presenting for surgery.4,5  In this issue of Anesthesiology, Canales et al. investigate whether point-of-care ultrasound imaging can help to identify older patients with frailty. While well-studied clinical tools exist to assess frailty, assessment is not routinely performed. In some circumstances, especially where patients are acutely unwell, clinical assessment may not be feasible. Therefore, the authors hypothesize that ultrasound assessment could be a useful tool to address the gap between guidelines and practice.7,8 

Fundamental to the hypothesis tested by Canales...

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