Background

Finger-cuff methods allow noninvasive continuous arterial pressure monitoring. This study aimed to determine whether continuous finger-cuff arterial pressure monitoring helps clinicians reduce hypotension within 15 min after starting induction of anesthesia and during noncardiac surgery. Specifically, this study tested the hypotheses that continuous finger-cuff—compared to intermittent oscillometric—arterial pressure monitoring helps clinicians reduce the area under a mean arterial pressure of 65 mmHg within 15 min after starting induction of anesthesia and the time-weighted average mean arterial pressure less than 65 mmHg during noncardiac surgery.

Methods

In this single-center trial, 242 noncardiac surgery patients were randomized to unblinded continuous finger-cuff arterial pressure monitoring or to intermittent oscillometric arterial pressure monitoring (with blinded continuous finger-cuff arterial pressure monitoring). The first of two hierarchical primary endpoints was the area under a mean arterial pressure of 65 mmHg within 15 min after starting induction of anesthesia; the second primary endpoint was the time-weighted average mean arterial pressure less than 65 mmHg during surgery.

Results

Within 15 min after starting induction of anesthesia, the median (interquartile range) area under a mean arterial pressure of 65 mmHg was 7 (0, 24) mmHg × min in 109 patients assigned to continuous finger-cuff monitoring versus 19 (0.3, 60) mmHg × min in 113 patients assigned to intermittent oscillometric monitoring (P = 0.004; estimated location shift: −6 [95% CI: −15 to −0.3] mmHg × min). During surgery, the median (interquartile range) time-weighted average mean arterial pressure less than 65 mmHg was 0.04 (0, 0.27) mmHg in 112 patients assigned to continuous finger-cuff monitoring and 0.40 (0.03, 1.74) mmHg in 115 patients assigned to intermittent oscillometric monitoring (P < 0.001; estimated location shift: −0.17 [95% CI: −0.41 to −0.05] mmHg).

Conclusions

Continuous finger-cuff arterial pressure monitoring helps clinicians reduce hypotension within 15 min after starting induction of anesthesia and during noncardiac surgery compared to intermittent oscillometric arterial pressure monitoring.

Editor’s Perspective
What We Already Know about This Topic
  • Finger-cuff systems allow noninvasive continuous arterial pressure monitoring

  • Previous trials of noncardiac surgery patients suggest that there is less intraoperative hypotension when arterial pressure is monitored continuously with a finger-cuff versus intermittently with oscillometry

What This Article Tells Us That Is New
  • In this single-center randomized trial of 242 noncardiac surgery patients, there was less hypotension (defined as a mean arterial pressure less than 65 mmHg) both during anesthetic induction and during surgery in patients having continuous finger-cuff monitoring compared with patients having intermittent oscillometric monitoring

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