In this month’s issue of Anesthesiology, Quaye et al. report findings of their investigation into differences in type of sedation and the detection of polyps during colonoscopy for screening and surveillance. Their study uses data from the New Hampshire Colonoscopy Registry to compare patients who received propofol for their procedure versus moderate sedation with benzodiazepines and opioids. Although the authors hypothesized that the use of propofol would improve the detection of polyps that might progress to colon cancer, in their final analysis, they found no association between sedation type and overall detection of adenomas (adjusted odds ratio, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.95 to 1.05) or any neoplasia (adjusted odds ratio, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.98 to 1.08). However, they reported a modest statistically and clinically significant association between propofol use and detection of serrated polyps (adjusted odds ratio, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.07 to 1.19).

Serrated polyps comprise a heterogeneous family...

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