The first appearance of the phrase a “call to action” in the medical literature was from Sir Thomas Oliver in the British Medical Journal in 1913 in relation to the use of a toxic compound, diachylon, to induce abortion in working class women. Sir Oliver argued that physicians had a moral duty to recognize this practice and discourage the use of diachylon “by all means.” A call to action for the medical profession highlights a persistent public health problem and the need for specific actions to be taken to rectify the situation. The call to action to preoperatively screen for geriatric conditions that increase the risk of adverse perioperative outcomes, such as frailty and cognitive dysfunction, has been ongoing since at least 2011. Since then, research has only strengthened the association between frailty and cognitive...

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