In the absence of available scientific evidence, many of our clinical decisions are driven by experience and intuition at best or by dogmatism at worst. This is especially true in pediatric anesthesia practice, where therapeutic actions are rarely supported by solid scientific foundations. This frustrating situation has, nevertheless, one fortuitous consequence: It can foster the kind of clinical research where important questions with potentially direct implications to patient care can be answered with relatively little effort.

In this issue of the journal, Lee et al. provide us with new data that nicely exemplify this possibility. The authors focus on gastric emptying times in neonates after formula feeding, an as yet unexplored but important question in the context of preoperative fasting in this population. Using serial ultrasound scans of the gastric antral cross-sectional area, before and every...

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