The supraglottic airway has proven its versatility in the operating room,1,2  emergency room, and field resuscitation. However, the risk of pulmonary aspiration associated with supraglottic airways still exists.4,5  The fundamental design of the supraglottic airway has not been significantly changed since its inauguration in the 1980s. Second-generation supraglottic airways were introduced to minimize the occurrence of aspiration by creating a channel for insertion of a gastric tube to suction gastric content. The efficacy of this additional channel remains unknown in human subjects. Modern anesthesia ventilators are equipped with a gas-sampling line that samples at rates up to 250 ml/min.9,10  This line can be used to identify the occurrence of regurgitation and subsequently remove regurgitated material, minimizing aspiration. The conventional configuration cannot achieve this goal, as the insertion point of a gas-sampling line is at the Y connection...

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