To the Editor:

In their editorial, Drs. Fiadjoe and Litman1  refer to the protracted learning curve of fiberoptic intubation in contrast to video laryngoscopy. This difference applies primarily to clinicians experienced in direct laryngoscopy but not in fiberoptic intubation. Beginning residents may find fiberoptic intubation easier to learn than video laryngoscopy, achieving a higher success rate with less trauma sooner with fiberoptic intubation than direct laryngoscopy and subsequent video laryngoscopy.2 

Training programs neglecting proficiency in fiberoptic intubation in favor of extensive experience with direct laryngoscopy may generate the graduates described by Drs. Fiadjoe and Litman. However, trainees graduating with proficiency in fiberoptic intubation and video laryngoscopy who continue to practice both make the comparison of academic interest only.

In summary, the observation by Drs. Fiadjoe and Litman regarding fiberoptics and video laryngoscopy may reflect differences among training programs rather than between the two techniques themselves.

References

1.
Fiadjoe
JE
,
Litman
RS
:
Difficult tracheal intubation: Looking to the past to determine the future.
Anesthesiology
2012
;
116
:
1181
2
2.
Pott
LM
,
Randel
GI
,
Straker
T
,
Becker
KD
,
Cooper
RM
:
A survey of airway training among U.S. and Canadian anesthesiology residency programs.
J Clin Anesth
2011
;
23
:
15
26