In the February 2014 issue, the propofol formulations named and discussed in this article are in error. Propoven®, which was used in the United States during a propofol shortage (see Jensen V, Rappaport BA: The reality of drug shortages—the case of the injectable agent propofol. N Engl J Med 2010;363:806–7),was presented as one of the drugs studied, whereas a different formation from the same manufacturer, Propofol® (Fresenius), was in fact studied. Propofol®, which is marketed worldwide but has never been used in the United States, contains only long-chain triglycerides. In contrast, Propoven® is formulated with a mixture of long- and medium-chain triglycerides.

The term Propofol® should replace Propoven® throughout the paper, except in the first paragraph of the introduction.

The comparison among the three formulations provides useful information in countries where all three are available. However, due to this error, the implications that a formulation marketed in the United States during the propofol shortage was studied are false, since they refer to a formulation which was not studied.

The authors contacted the journal with this information and regret the error.

1.
Le
Guen M
,
Grassin-Delyle
S
,
Cornet
C
,
Genty
A
,
Chazot
T
,
Dardelle
D
,
Liu
N
,
Dreyfus
J-F
,
Mazoit
J-X
,
Devillier
P
,
Alvarez
J-C
,
Sessler
DI
,
Fischler
M
:
Comparison of the potency of different propofol formulations: A randomized, double-blind trial using closed-loop administration.
Anesthesiology
2014
;
120
:
355
64