Chiseled from marble in 1716, Sleeping Endymion (right) reflects the Rococo-Period prowess of Italian sculptor Agostino Cornacchini (1686 to 1754). According to classical Greek mythology, the handsome Endymion was a shepherd prince who was the first mortal to observe the moon. Personified as a Titan goddess named Selene, the Moon (left) reciprocated, unable to keep her eyes off the charming young man. She turned to her cousin, the king of the gods, to immortalize her dear Endymion. Zeus obliged by giving her lover the ultimate anesthetic, leaving Endymion forever young but forever sleepy. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)

Chiseled from marble in 1716, Sleeping Endymion (right) reflects the Rococo-Period prowess of Italian sculptor Agostino Cornacchini (1686 to 1754). According to classical Greek mythology, the handsome Endymion was a shepherd prince who was the first mortal to observe the moon. Personified as a Titan goddess named Selene, the Moon (left) reciprocated, unable to keep her eyes off the charming young man. She turned to her cousin, the king of the gods, to immortalize her dear Endymion. Zeus obliged by giving her lover the ultimate anesthetic, leaving Endymion forever young but forever sleepy. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)

George S. Bause, M.D., M.P.H., Honorary Curator, ASA’s Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, Schaumburg, Illinois, and Clinical Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. UJYC@aol.com.