On the morning of November 28, 1912, farmer William A. Smith alerted the police that his covered wagon had been burglarized while parked curbside, under a streetlight, at “Fulton and West Market streets” in the Elk Street Market of Buffalo, New York. Thieves had broken into cages; had stolen five turkeys, five geese, and 15 chickens; and had then driven the fowl away, presumably in another wagon. Sleeping in wagons within earshot of Smith’s, a hundred fellow farmers heard nary a squawk; neither were there any feathers in the coops to suggest that robbers had wrestled with any of the birds. As recorded in the Buffalo Evening News, detectives determined that the bold burglars had chloroformed the fowl before breaking into their cages. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)

On the morning of November 28, 1912, farmer William A. Smith alerted the police that his covered wagon had been burglarized while parked curbside, under a streetlight, at “Fulton and West Market streets” in the Elk Street Market of Buffalo, New York. Thieves had broken into cages; had stolen five turkeys, five geese, and 15 chickens; and had then driven the fowl away, presumably in another wagon. Sleeping in wagons within earshot of Smith’s, a hundred fellow farmers heard nary a squawk; neither were there any feathers in the coops to suggest that robbers had wrestled with any of the birds. As recorded in the Buffalo Evening News, detectives determined that the bold burglars had chloroformed the fowl before breaking into their cages. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)

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George S. Bause, M.D., M.P.H., Honorary Curator and Laureate of the History of Anesthesia, Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, Schaumburg, Illinois, and Clinical Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. UJYC@aol.com.