From Springfield, Massachusetts, Dr. Clarence Crowell Haskell (1858 to 1917) published a ca. 1870 pamphlet advertising (left) that he administered nitrous oxide “every day.” By touting that “3000 teeth already extracted testify to the superiority of the gas over all other anesthetics,” Dr. Haskell was mimicking pioneer anesthetist G. Q. Colton, who had advertised his own revival of nitrous-oxide anesthesia. With Haskell’s slogan (upper right), “Ether administered when desired,” he afforded an alternate anesthetic for those not happy to receive laughing gas. “Pupblic” patients (lower right) could only pray that Dr. Haskell could administer anesthetics better than he could spell or proofread…. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)

From Springfield, Massachusetts, Dr. Clarence Crowell Haskell (1858 to 1917) published a ca. 1870 pamphlet advertising (left) that he administered nitrous oxide “every day.” By touting that “3000 teeth already extracted testify to the superiority of the gas over all other anesthetics,” Dr. Haskell was mimicking pioneer anesthetist G. Q. Colton, who had advertised his own revival of nitrous-oxide anesthesia. With Haskell’s slogan (upper right), “Ether administered when desired,” he afforded an alternate anesthetic for those not happy to receive laughing gas. “Pupblic” patients (lower right) could only pray that Dr. Haskell could administer anesthetics better than he could spell or proofread…. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)

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George S. Bause, M.D., M.P.H., Honorary Curator and Laureate of the History of Anesthesia, Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, Schaumburg, Illinois, and Clinical Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. UJYC@aol.com.