A television series starring Jane Seymour, Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman portrayed the adventures of a physician as supposedly set from 1867 to 1873 in Colorado Springs, Colorado. Manufactured by J. J. Griffin of London, this Portable Vernon Harcourt Chloroform Inhaler (right) was borrowed from its previous owner as a prop on the Dr. Quinn set. Because inventor A. G. Vernon Harcourt did not reveal his eponymous inhaler (depicted, left) to the Royal Society until 1902, the appearance of the device on Dr. Quinn was at least a 30-yr anachronism. Fortunately, the prop was sold to the Wood Library-Museum well before the entire set of Dr. Quinn in California’s Agoura Hills was burned to the ground in the 2018 Woolsey Wildfire. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)

A television series starring Jane Seymour, Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman portrayed the adventures of a physician as supposedly set from 1867 to 1873 in Colorado Springs, Colorado. Manufactured by J. J. Griffin of London, this Portable Vernon Harcourt Chloroform Inhaler (right) was borrowed from its previous owner as a prop on the Dr. Quinn set. Because inventor A. G. Vernon Harcourt did not reveal his eponymous inhaler (depicted, left) to the Royal Society until 1902, the appearance of the device on Dr. Quinn was at least a 30-yr anachronism. Fortunately, the prop was sold to the Wood Library-Museum well before the entire set of Dr. Quinn in California’s Agoura Hills was burned to the ground in the 2018 Woolsey Wildfire. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)

George S. Bause, M.D., M.P.H., Honorary Curator and Laureate of the History of Anesthesia, Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, Schaumburg, Illinois, and Clinical Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. UJYC@aol.com.