After earning his D.D.S. in 1879 from the Pennsylvania College of Dental Surgery, Oliver Walcott Hall made anesthesia history on Boston’s Tremont Street as an early advocate of “Vitalized Air” (above), which, in this case, was nitrous oxide adulterated with alcohol and chloroform. After his wife had passed away, a stunned Dr. Hall stumbled across evidence of adultery and made legal history by filing an “alienation of affection” case against his late wife’s lover. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)

After earning his D.D.S. in 1879 from the Pennsylvania College of Dental Surgery, Oliver Walcott Hall made anesthesia history on Boston’s Tremont Street as an early advocate of “Vitalized Air” (above), which, in this case, was nitrous oxide adulterated with alcohol and chloroform. After his wife had passed away, a stunned Dr. Hall stumbled across evidence of adultery and made legal history by filing an “alienation of affection” case against his late wife’s lover. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)

George S. Bause, M.D., M.P.H., Honorary Curator and Laureate of the History of Anesthesia, Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, Schaumburg, Illinois, and Clinical Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. UJYC@aol.com.