Skip to Main Content

Advertisement

Skip Nav Destination

Issues

Table of Contents

Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, A13–A18. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.anes.0000452343.92265.59

Editorial Board

Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, A15–A16. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.anes.0000452342.15137.bb

This Month in Anesthesiology

Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, A3–A4. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.anes.0000452340.69394.68

Science, Medicine, and the Anesthesiologist

Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, A19–A20. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.anes.0000452344.92265.97

Infographics in Anesthesiology

Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, A21. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.anes.0000452345.99889.fc

Anesthesiology CME Program

Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, A17. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.anes.0000452341.07513.a1

Editorial

Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, 439–441. https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000000370
Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, 442–444. https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000000368
Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, 445–446. https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000000374
Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, 447–449. https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000000372

Perioperative Medicine: Clinical Science

Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, 450–458. https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000000369

In a review of the past 2 decades of closed anesthesia malpractice claims, two areas (obstetrics and spinal surgery) were overrepresented. Common to many cases were lack of timely diagnosis, timely transfusion, and reoperation, often reflecting poor team communication.

Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, 459–468. https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000000367

In a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled crossover study, GAL021 stimulated ventilation in male volunteers with alfentanil-induced respiratory depression at a clamped and elevated end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure, increasing both tidal volume and respiratory rate. GAL021 also stimulated poikilocapnic ventilation during alfentanil administration, without affecting sedation, antinociception, hemodynamics, or safety parameters.

Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, 469–481. https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000000301

Tidal volumes of 6 versus 10 ml/kg of ideal body weight in patients with normal lungs were prospectively and randomly compared in terms of markers of lung injury. A significant increase in plasma levels of neutrophil elastase in the VT6 group and Clara cell protein 16 in the VT10 group was observed, which may represent the effect of atelectrauma and increased alveolar distention, respectively.

Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, 482–491. https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000000313

The main causes of survived intraoperative arrest were preoperative complications (33%), anesthetic complications (28%), and surgical complications (26%). The initial recorded rhythms were asystole (57%), pulseless electrical activity (31%), and ventricular fibrillation (16%). By day 90, 44% of the survivors had a good functional outcome.

Supplemental Digital Content is available in the text

Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, 492–500. https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000000336

In a preplanned secondary analysis of 291 cardiac surgical patients randomized to receive perioperative dexamethasone or placebo, the treatment groups did not differ in the incidence of postoperative cognitive decline 1 or 12 months after surgery. These results fail to support the use of dexamethasone to prevent postoperative cognitive decline in heart surgery patients.

Supplemental Digital Content is available in the text

Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, 501–509. https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000000338

Use of a Maximum Surgical Blood Order Schedule in a tertiary hospital reduced blood over-ordering from 40 to 25% of patients. Emergency release of uncrossmatched blood increased from 0.22 to 0.31%. Combining the Maximum Surgical Blood Order Schedule with electronic crossmatching reduced costs by $6 per patient.

Supplemental Digital Content is available in the text

Perioperative Medicine: Basic Science

Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, 510–527. https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000000278

Sevoflurane induced Tau phosphorylation and GSK3β activation and led to cognitive impairment 3 weeks after exposure in 6-day-old mice. The simultaneous administration of the GSK3β inhibitor lithium prevented the cognitive impairment. Increased Tau phosphorylation may contribute to the anesthesia-induced cognitive impairment in neonatal animals and GSK3β may serve as a therapeutic target for the prevention of this impairment.

Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, 528–537. https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000000316

At a dose of 1 minimum alveolar concentration, isoflurane activated InsP3R and this activation was accompanied by an increase in intracellular calcium. Moreover, cell death was increased by isoflurane. The data support the premise that isoflurane modulates InsP3R calcium-release channel and this activity may underlie a variety of effects of isoflurane, including neurotoxicity.

Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, 538–548. https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000000295

In mice, cardiac preconditioning from isoflurane involved increased caveolin levels in mitochondria and their associated improved respiratory function. These effects were blocked by pretreatment with Gi inhibitors, suggesting that agents that target Gi and caveolin trafficking may serve as cardioprotective agents.

Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, 549–562. https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000000314

Using in vivo and in vitro models of ischemia, sevoflurane preconditioning reduced astrocytic NRDG2 expression and neuronal apoptosis, which was counteracted by NDRG2 overexpression. Reduction of astrocytic NDRG2 expression by sevoflurane preconditioning is a novel astrocyte-mediated mechanism for anesthetic neuroprotection.

Critical Care Medicine: Clinical Science

Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, 563–571. https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000000371

In 10 patients with auto-positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP), neurally adjusted ventilator assist (NAVA) ventilation and pressure support ventilation (PSV) were compared during PEEP trials. The pressures required to overcome auto-PEEP were significantly less with NAVA than with PSV and could be reliably assessed by diaprhagmatic electrical activity (EAdi) monitoring in comparison with esophageal pressure.

Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, 572–581. https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000000373

Lung recruitability and computed tomography scan–derived positive end-expiratory pressure are unrelated. The positive end-expiratory pressure required in patients who had more recruitment and less recruitment were similar.

Supplemental Digital Content is available in the text

Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, 582–590. https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000000321

In a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study of patients with preexisting impaired renal function undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting, preoperative administration of a high dose of recombinant human erythropoietin had no renal protective effects.

Pain Medicine: Clinical Science

Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, 591–608. https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000000307

In a systematic review of 15 studies including approximately 1,000 patients, heterogeneity in drug, dose, timing, and outcome measure as well as general low quality precludes definitive conclusions although a majority of studies reported positive outcomes. There is insufficient evidence to support the routine use of antidepressants for analgesia in the perioperative period.

Pain Medicine: Basic Science

Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, 609–619. https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000000291

Knockdown of the GluR1-interacting protein stargazin by intrathecal small interfering RNA reduced both postoperative pain and membrane GluR1 levels in a rat plantar incision model. Targeting the stargazin–GluR1 subunit interaction could provide a novel analgesic approach for postoperative pain.

Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, 620–631. https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000000296

The neurosteroids tested produced voltage and use-dependent block of all the subtypes tested, with more potent effects on Nav1.2. Inhibition of Nav1.2 in the spinal cord by allopregnanolone is a plausible mechanism for its analgesic effects if confirmed in neuronal preparations and pain models.

Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, 632–643. https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000000277

In rats, a mixed gluco- and mineralocorticoid agonist (6-α methylprednisolone) was less effective than a glucocorticoid-selective agonist in reducing behavioral sensory afferent hypersensitivity, and combination of 6-α methylprednisolone with a mineralocorticoid antagonist improved its efficacy.

Supplemental Digital Content is available in the text

Education

Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, 644–653. https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000000350

Education: Images in Anesthesiology

Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, 654. https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0b013e31829b36af

Education: Clinical Concepts and Commentary

Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, 655–659. https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000000303

Simulation-based training courses for maintenance of certification in anesthesiology have been very well received and have led to widespread reports of meaningful practice improvement.

Education: Mind to Mind

Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, 660. https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000000240
Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, 661. https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000000305

Correspondence

Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, 662. https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000000341
Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, 662–663. https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000000342
Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, 663–664. https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000000348
Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, 664. https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000000349
Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, 664–665. https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000000354
Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, 665–666. https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000000355
Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, 666. https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000000356
Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, 667–668. https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000000357
Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, 668–669. https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000000358
Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, 669. https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000000359

Reviews of Educational Material

Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, 670. https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000000208
Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, 670–671. https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000000230

Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum

Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, 527. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.anes.0000452346.94051.c3
Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, 590. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.anes.0000452347.01675.cd
Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, 643. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.anes.0000452348.78804.52

Erratum

Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, 672. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.anes.0000452349.78804.1b

Retraction

Anesthesiology September 2014, Vol. 121, 672. https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000449849.03021.17
Close Modal

or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal