Skip to Main Content

Advertisement

Types of Papers Types of Papers 
  1. Original Investigations
    The Original Investigation article type consists of the four central aspects of the medical specialty of anesthesiology:
    • Perioperative Medicine
    • Critical Care Medicine
    • Pain Medicine
    • Education
    Although there is overlap, authors will choose one of these areas as the article type during the submission process. Original investigations may include laboratory science, animal research, clinical investigations (including but not limited to clinical trials), observational research and meta-analysis (a quantitative statistical analysis of several combined separate but similar experiments or studies that measure the same outcome in order to test the pooled data for statistical significance). Consideration of a meta-analysis for peer review and publication requires a presubmission inquiry and approval for submission. See the "PreSubmission Approval" section under general information. Other types of Original Investigation submissions do not require presubmission approval. Original Investigation submissions range in length from 1500 to 4000 words. Abbreviated titles are required. All Original Investigations require a structured abstract (see Manuscript Preparation). Articles should be accompanied by no more than 50 references. Sources of compounds, reagents, and equipment should be identified by name and affiliation. Refer to drugs by their generic or chemical name, without abbreviation). Use a code number only when a generic name is not yet available. The identity and structure of novel research compounds, chemicals, biologics, and devices must be cited, or provided if not previously published. Report the source of cell lines, and, if known, their authentication and mycoplasma contamination status. 
  2. Back to top

  3. Comprehensive Reviews
    Comprehensive Reviews summarize and synthesize older and current ideas and publications, and may suggest new concepts. They typically cover broad areas and with appropriate depth. They may be clinical, investigational, or basic science in nature and intended for one or more of these readerships. Comprehensive reviews may be Narrative Reviews or Systematic Reviews. Systematic Reviews without meta-analysis are published as Reviews, while those with meta-analysis are published as Original Investigations. Comprehensive Reviews should be written by recognized experts in the field, with requisite experience, as evidenced by substantial peer reviewed publications in the topic area. 

    Comprehensive Reviews are invited or require preapproval. Consideration of a Comprehensive Review for peer review and publication requires a presubmission inquiry and approval for submission. See Presubmission Approval for requirements and contact information.

    Comprehensive Reviews range in length from 3,000 to 8,000 words. Review article are well-served by including summary figures and/or tables that help emphasize critical concepts. An unstructured abstract of 150 words  maximum (one- or two-paragraph summary of the key points) is required. An Abbreviated Title and a Summary Statement is required on the Title Page. The Abbreviated Title should be limited to 50 characters maximum. The Summary Statement should be limited to 35 words maximum.
  4. Back to top

  5. Clinical Focus Review
    Clinical Focus Review are brief reviews (2,000 to 3,000 words) focused on clinical topics. Clinical Focus Reviews are intended for the practicing clinician, should be written by individuals with substantial experience and expertise in the field, must be evidence-based, and emphasize the clinical aspects of the subject. Clinical Focus Reviews are invited or require pre-approval. Consideration of a Clinical Focus Review for peer review and publication requires a presubmission inquiry and approval for submission. See "Presubmission Approval" for requirements and contact information.

    An Abbreviated Title and a Summary Statement is required on the Title Page. The Abbreviated Title should be limited to 50 characters maximum. The Summary Statement should be limited to 35 words maximum. Articles should be accompanied by no more than 50 references. This article type has no abstract. If accepted for publication, we seek to include two color illustrations (any combination of tables and/or figures to be determined by the authors) to enhance the effectiveness of the publication. Illustrations submitted with the manuscript can be in draft form. A professional artist may produce the final figures.
  6. Back to top

  7. Readers Toolbox
    Readers Toolbox articles are general educational overviews intended to increase comprehension among investigators and researchers. There is presently one type of Toolbox article, Understanding Research Methods.

    Understanding Research Methods: Introductory yet comprehensive articles (2,000 to 5,000 words) that present existing and emerging research methods which are, or will become, relevant to anesthesiology research. Articles are intended for non-experts - both clinicians and investigators - to help them keep abreast of new research techniques.  Articles should enable readers to better read and understand the Original Investigations in Anesthesiology, and make investigators aware of new tools and approaches to incorporate into their investigative armamentarium. Articles should be written by recognized experts, who have requisite experience with the new methodology as evidenced by relevant peer-reviewed publications. Articles should be approachable, clearly presented, understandable, and meaningful to a non-expert unfamiliar with the research technique. They should be attractive, readable and emphasize the use of visual and tabular information. A primer format, with gradually increasing detail as the reader gets farther into the article is a useful construct. Further information is available in an Editorial (Kharasch ED: New Article Type: Understanding research methods and the readers toolbox. Anesthesiology 2019).

    Consideration of an Understanding Research Methods article for peer review and publication requires a presubmission inquiry and approval for submission. See the "Presubmission Approval" for Requirements and contact information.

    Articles should include the following:
    • A brief 150-word unstructured summary, figure legends and references.
    • An infographic (see Infographics in Anesthesiology -- Complex Information for Anesthesiologists Presented Quickly and Clearly) which should be numbered as figure 1.
    • An introduction which frames the general topic and general application area (basic science, clinical research, outcomes, health services, statistics, etc); limitations of current or older methods related to the newer approach; motivation for the development of the new approach; description of the new methodology; technology; or approach (provide a working understanding not an exhaustive technical review); specific advantages and limitations of the new methods.
    • Examples of how the new method is used to address a research question might be provided; how the method is used in laboratory, clinical, or population research; ideally providing one or two "working examples." References to seminal articles using the method would be valuable.
    • Descriptions of any specialized equipment and/or training and other practical issues, with focus on generic technology not on specific manufacturers or vendors. A brief discussion of general costs may be appropriate. Describe pertinent variations of the method and likely future evolution and application of the new method.
    • Three to six display elements (tables, text boxes, or up to 4 additional figures) which help highlight and explain the text, and enhance the effectiveness of communication. Figures, tables and text boxes must be cited in the text in consecutive number order. Boxes can be used for explaining and highlighting basic concepts. Boxes must have a short title, contain up to 300 words and may include a table or equations. Text presentation in boxes may be used sparingly. Two of the boxes  must be titled (1) "What to look for in research using this method" and (2) "Where to find more information on this topic." Figures can be drawings, schematics, photographs, and/or graphs. Use of color is encouraged. Redrawing rather than reproduction of published figures is preferred. Draft figures may be included in the initial manuscript submission. Final figures should be submitted as a separate field, clearly labeled with the figure number. Each figure must have a short title and a focused legend that guides the reader through each element of the figure.
    Back to top

    Special Articles
    Anesthesiology occasionally publishes Special Articles (e.g., history, education, demography, contemporary issues, etc.).
    Consideration of a Special Article for peer review and publication requires a presubmission inquiry and approval for submission. See "Presubmission Approval" for requirements and contact information. An unstructured abstract of 150 word maximum (one- or two-paragraph summary of the key points) is required. An Abbreviated Title and a Summary Statement is required on the Title Page. The Abbreviated Title should be limited to 50 characters maximum. The Summary Statement should be limited to 35 words maximum.
    Back to top


  8. Images in Anesthesiology
    Images in Anesthesiology (IiA) are succinct submissions that couple an interesting, novel, or highly educational image with brief text designed to highlight the pertinent anesthesiology-focused information displayed by the image. Supplemental video content can be included to expand the visual learning. The focus of an IiA submission is the image itself, and key educational points raised in the body of the text should be directly related to observation of the image. The IiA section of the Journal is not to be used as a forum for case reports. IiA manuscripts are intended to educate medical students, residents, fellows, anesthesiology practitioners, and interested physicians and scientists.

    IiA manuscripts are limited to 250 words, should include 3 references, and must not have more than 4 authors. The image should be one frame that on occasion might have two coupled panels. Labeling of the image should focus attention to the intended educational message. Rather than including a legend for the image, its description should be incorporated into the body of the text.
    Back to top

  9. Mind to Mind
    Mind to Mind is a creative writing section devoted to exploring the abstract realm of our profession and our lives. Submitted works can be poetry, fiction, or creative nonfiction. Limit submissions to 1,200 words or less. Authors can be students or a current or emeritus member of the anesthesia, perioperative, critical care, or pain teams. Patients may submit writing about their medical experience. Provide a Title Page (See Title Page). The piece may be published anonymously at the author’s request, however, authors’ names, conflicts of interest, and other information are required during submission on the title page. Pieces must respect confidentiality as needed.
    Back to top


    Letters to the Editors
    The peer review process does not necessarily stop with the publication of research articles. Letters to the Editors may offer commentary on published articles or be "freestanding." Letters may raise issues in the conduct, reporting or interpretation of original research reported in Anesthesiology, request additional information or offer alternative interpretations and conclusions. "Freestanding" Letters to the Editor also may discuss matters of general interest to anesthesiologists, without specific linkage to recently published articles. Letters are not a venue for reporting original research findings or case reports, and authors must attest during the submission process that a case description is not included in the submission.

    Letters to the Editor should be brief (250 to 750 words). A few references, a small table, or a pertinent illustration may be used. Supply an original title for the Letter on the Title Page. Do not submit Abbreviated Titles, Summary Statements, and Abstracts. Letters may offer criticism of published material. They must be objective and constructive. 

    NOTE: Letters commenting on published articles will be sent to the corresponding author of that article, with an invitation to reply. Letters commenting on published articles must be received in the Editorial Office no later than two months after the first of the month of the original article print publication date.
    Back to top

  10. Other Article Types
    Anesthesiology also publishes 1) Editorials, 2) Classic Papers Revisited, and 3) Review of Educational Materials (book reviews). These are typically solicited. Please contact the Editorial Office for further information.

    NOTE: Case reports, case series, case scenarios, and correspondence/Letters to the Editors describing cases are not published by Anesthesiology and are not accepted for review (see Eisenach JC: Case reports are leaving Anesthesiology, but not the specialty. Anesthesiology 2013; 118:479).
  11. Back to top
Close Modal

or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal