In a recent issue of the ASA Monitor, Neil et al.1 eloquently describe the current state of artificial intelligence (AI) and robotics in the field of anesthesiology. They conclude that AI and robotics are not coming to replace us, but to rescue us. In this issue, we will consider the possible impact of these technologies on the future of the specialty and chart a course that will let the specialty continue to thrive and pursue ASA’s vision to improve “health through innovation in quality and safety.”

Efforts to automate maintenance of anesthesia began in 1950 with Bickford’s apparatus and have only grown more complex since then. They have all utilized the closed loop feedback system to manage one or more of the domains necessary to successfully maintain general anesthesia, which requires a bespoke system of rules...

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