“If everyone is thinking alike, then no one is thinking.” Benjamin Franklin’s early definition of diversity is still relevant today. The strength of our medical community lies in its members: scientists, academic faculty, community practitioners and trainees. Members’ differences in ethnicity, age, gender, sexual orientation and political or religious beliefs enrich our discussions and facilitate innovative scientific discovery. Diversity in medicine also serves to improve the experience of our patients through cultural competency and trust.2-5  Our medical organizations serve as a forum for engaging with one another, ultimately to effectuate the best in patient care. The Society for Neuroscience in Anesthesiology and Critical Care (SNACC), a 43-year-old organization, was given breath by a small group of like-minded neurosurgeons and neuro-anesthesiologists. SNACC bylaws governing membership acknowledge that the “maximum benefit in patient care will require an...

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