In recent years, there has been an increased focus on measuring and rewarding patients’ experience of their health care. Those receiving person-centered care are more satisfied. Overall satisfaction with care is positively associated with improved clinical quality measures, including the process of care (i.e., clinical adherence to treatment guidelines) and clinical outcomes (e.g., readmission rate). Also, clinical quality measures that are visible and tangible for patients are strongly associated with patient experience. Of note, the quality indicators for perioperative care – such as appropriate preoperative continuation of beta-blockers, administration of the right antibiotic at the right time, removal of urinary catheters on the first or second day after surgery, appropriate venous thromboembolism prophylaxis, and discontinuation of preventive antibiotics at the right time, although important for improved outcomes – do not directly address patients’ priorities.

Patient-centered models allow patients...

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